Last edited by Gutaur
Tuesday, October 6, 2020 | History

6 edition of Lac La Biche and the early fur traders found in the catalog.

Lac La Biche and the early fur traders

Edward J. McCullough

Lac La Biche and the early fur traders

by Edward J. McCullough

  • 311 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Canadian Circumpolar Institute, Alberta Vocational College, Lac La Biche, Archeological Society of Alberta, Distributed by University of Alberta Press in [Edmonton, Alta.], [Lac La Biche], [Edmonton] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fur traders -- Alberta -- Lac La Biche Region,
  • Lac La Biche Region (Alta.) -- History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-202).

    StatementEdward J. McCullough and Michael Maccagno.
    SeriesOccasional publication -- no. 29, Occasional publication series (Canadian Circumpolar Institute) -- no. 29.
    ContributionsMaccagno, Michael.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 227 p. :
    Number of Pages227
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13595198M
    ISBN 100919058779, 0919050779
    OCLC/WorldCa26137167

    A few years later, in , the railroad reached the town. Bishop Émile J. Legal wrote that "a new era of prosperity seems to be still in store for the county of Lac La Biche." The town and region of Lac La Biche were subjected to an immense forest fire which destroyed almost the entire town in It was an important part of the early fur trade routes. The portage became a Provincial Historic Resource in It is the only portage to have this status in Alberta. Sir Winston Churchill Provincial Park. Sir Winston Churchill Provincial Park is located on an island in Lac La Biche lake. The park is great for picnics, day hikes and bird.

      Many of them appeared as "Life at Lac La Biche: Letters of W.E. Traill, ," edited by E.J. McCullough and Michael Maccagno, in the Spring, Summer, and Autumn issues of Alberta History. Now, these and other letters encompassing Traill's fur trade career have been produced. His son, Tom Maccagno, also an activist for the Lac La Biche region, served as Mayor of Lac La Biche from to Michael Maccagno also authored Lac La Biche and the Early Fur Traders in Michael Maccagno passed away in Lac La Biche in November in

    It was also abandoned by , but Lac La Biche was established as a permanent place of residence for some French-Canadian and Métis freetraders and their families. Fur trade activity continued unbroken, due to the importance of the portage, and Lac La Biche was visited by fur traders such as Gabriel Franchère and Ross Cox. David Thompson returned in Planning region: Lower Athabasca. This trading post was part of a network used to transport furs from Lac La Biche to the east, serving an important role in the country’s early fur trade industry. However, it was not until that the first British, Swedish, Norwegian, Swiss and French-speaking homesteaders arrived and settled the area.


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Lac La Biche and the early fur traders by Edward J. McCullough Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lac La Biche and the Early Fur Traders (Occasional Publications Series) Paperback – January 1, by Edward J. McCullough (Author), Michael Maccagno (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editionsCited by: 4.

Lac La Biche served for many years as a 'gateway community' for fur trade in western Canada. This important role, neglected in historical and archaeological research, is documented in detail here. Rich in reproductions of historical documents, photographs, and archaeological remains, this book provides an intimate look at the fur trader's perspective and that of the people who settled the town of Lac La Biche.

Rich in reproductions of historical documents, photographs, and archaeological remains, this book provides an intimate look at the fur trader's perspective and that of the people who settled the. viii, p.: 27 cm This detailed study of the g̀ateway community' of Lac la Biche in northern Alberta examines life in the region during the fur trade near the Beaver River route, Portage La Biche, Red Deers Lake House, Greenwich House and Lac La Biche PostPages: Lac La Biche and the Early Fur Traders by EDWARD J.

MCCULLOUGH,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Borrow it Toggle Dropdown Albert D. Cohen Management Library; Architecture/Fine Arts Library; Archives and Special Collections; Bibliothèque Alfred-Monnin (Université de Saint-Boniface).

Lac La Biche served for many years as a 'gateway community' for fur trade in western Canada. This important role, neglected in historical and archaeological research, is documented in detail here.

Rich in reproductions of historical documents, photographs, and archaeological remains, this book provides an intimate look at the fur trader's. Lac La Biche and the Early Fur Traders Edward J.

McCullough and Michael Maccagno, Paperback, $ If you’re interested in these books or wondering what else we have in our shop, feel free to visit us at the museum or contact us. Portage La Biche was used as a transportation corridor by Cree middlemen and Métis fur traders for many years before the arrival of David Thompson in The route Thompson took to Lac La Biche was shown to him by Laderoote, a guide who met Thompson’s brigade by modern-day Briereville.

The region between Lac La Biche and Jasper became a favoured area of settlement for free-men who often acted as guides or pilots.

For the fur trade companies, the route through Lac La Biche to the Athabasca River was a critical transportation link for a number of years. Lac La Biche and the early fur traders. [Edward J McCullough; Michael Maccagno] -- This detailed study of the g̀ateway community' of Lac la Biche in northern Alberta examines life in the region during the fur trade near the Beaver River route, Portage La Biche, Red Deers Lake.

Lac La Biche chronicles: The early years Hardcover – January 1, by Gregory A Johnson (Author) › Visit Amazon's Gregory A Johnson Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Amazon Second Chance Pass it on, trade it in, give it a second life:Price: $ Get this from a library.

Lac La Biche and the early fur traders. [E J McCullough; Mike Maccagno; Canadian Circumpolar Institute.; Archaeological Society of Alberta.] -- This detailed study of the 'gateway community' of Lac la Biche in northern Alberta examines life in the region during the fur trade near the Beaver River route, Portage La Biche, Red Deers Lake.

Search our fur trade post maps to find the location of a Hudson’s Bay Company fur trade post. Please note that only Hudson’s Bay Company fur trade posts appear in these maps because the map is based on the fur trade posts originally included in the Archives’ “Section B” records.

Portage La Biche connects the Athabasca River and the Churchill River systems. It was an important part of the early fur trade routes.

The portage became a Provincial Historic Resource in It is the only portage to have this status in Alberta. Lac La Biche and the Early Fur Traders: Edward J. McCullough, Michael Maccagno: Books -   LAC LA BICHE MISSION Mission Road • Open 10 am to 5 pm every day The Lac La Biche Mission was established inand it was an important landmark of the fur trade.

The trading post at Lac La Biche Lake became a stopping point for voyageurs and fur traders on their expeditions, and Catholic priests established the Lac La Biche Mission in Lac La Biche County’s other urban centre, the hamlet of Plamondon, took root in the early s.

David Thompson (30 April – 10 February ) was a British-Canadian fur trader, surveyor, and cartographer, known to some native peoples as Koo-Koo-Sint or "the Stargazer". Over Thompson's career, he traveled s kilometres (56, mi) across North America, mapping million square kilometres ( million square miles) of North America along the : 10 February (aged 86), Longueuil, Canada East.

A type of early Cree pottery known as learwater Punctate, which is found regularly in the Saskatchewan forests, was also found on Black Fox Island on Lac La Biche, and on the shores of Wappau Lake. The Cree, who had good relations with the early White Fur traders, served as middlemen between the White fur traders and the interior tribes as.

Books shelved as fur-trade: The Revenant by Michael Punke, Across the Wide Missouri by Bernard DeVoto, Fur, Fortune, and Empire: The Epic History of the.During your stay in Lac La Biche, also try visiting the Lac La Biche Regional Museum & Discovery Centre to learn about the people and events that shaped Lac La Biche.

Meet the wildlife of the boreal forest, revisit the fur trade and the pioneer age, and take an up-close look at unique local treasures that all have stories of their own.

Lac La Biche County is located km northeast of Edmonton on the south shore of the lake of the same name. Incorporated as a town inLac La Biche amalgamated with Lakeland County in to create Lac La Biche County. The lake was named after the elk in the area that reminded the fur traders of its smaller European cousin.